Wednesday, January 31, 2007

The True Athlete of the Week



No one named you Lord of the Blog, Human Hyperbole. A washed-up superstar who has never seen the second round and plays for an irrelevant middle tier Western Conference team isn't this Committee's Athlete of the Week! We only honor champions.

8 comments:

vwz said...

Dude, you keep worry about beating the worst team in the Western Conference by 1 point; and leave naming human athletes of the week to me...

Head Dude said...

38-9

The Franchise said...

Um, not to get in the middle of the ongoing (and tedious) Mavs versus Rockets debate, but I also object to naming Barbaro the Athlete of the Week. On what grounds? Um, because he's a horse mostly, and also that he hasn't done anything athletic since he broke his leg. Barbaro's post-injury life is almost a shoe-in for most ridiculous "sports" story of the decade, though there are a few years still to go...

vwz said...

I'm glad that I wasn't the only dude who found Izzy's fascination with Barbaro more than slightly disturbing

Head Dude said...

Look dudes, Barbaro was a national hero, something that neither Tracy McGrady nor Dirk Nowitzki will ever be, at least outside of Germany. I was just giving him his due -- he's gotten more attention than just about any athlete over the past 9 months, so it's hard to characterize my fascination as disturbing. Being fascinated with SMG, now that's disturbing.

vwz said...

A national hero?? For crying out loud Izzy, it's a HORSE!! While it's true that it has received a significant amount of national attention, you have to ask the question of "was the attention justified and/or necessary??" and most importantly, "what does it say about our society that a HORSE can hold our imaginations captive?"

Simply put, Barbaro was bred, raised and trained to race. His entire life was choreographed, and much of it unknown to the rest of us until the Preakness. From then on, its owners sought to keep it alive so it could generate the studding fees they had hoped for all along. Yet, it's this exercise in futility to preserve its investment value (don't think for a second that a lesser horse would have received the same amount of treatment and care) that so captivated the nation's eyes and ears.

Frankly, I was appalled at the amount of attention paid to Barbaro - much of it unnecessary, and all of it unknown to Barbaro itself. A horse was bred, trained for three years, suffered a horrific injury, kept on life support because it was worth millions, and died - end of story. More than anything, I think this story exposed the underbelly of the sordidness of thoroughbred racing and the commodification of its animal participants more than anything else.

ThadisRad said...

"Simply put, Barbaro was bred, raised and trained to race. His entire life was choreographed, and much of it unknown to the rest of us until the Preakness. "

Replace Barbaro with Yao Ming and race with play hoops, and you're also describing your hero. Here's hoping Yao doesn't become a glue stick anytime soon.

Head Dude said...

And that last post was why we need more Neal Morgan on this blog. The more, the better.