Monday, March 26, 2007

ESPN's PTI Crew Debates Lindsey Harding

Not to pry the giant can of worms that's been plaguing DudeSpin unity over the past day or so back open, but...

On tonight's epsiode of "Pardon the Interruption," the guys answered an e-mail from a viewer that posed the question of whether or not Lindsey Harding would be getting ripped right now if she was a man. It sparked the most debate of the evening, with Michael Wilbon saying no college player would be criticized for missing those two free throws and Tony Kornheiser arguing that former Dukie J.J. Redick or current UCLA star Arron Afflalo would have torn apart by everyone for coming up short in a similar situation.

With no resolution coming either here or on PTI, I propose a tag team match! In this corner, representing sentimental romantic sports fans everywhere, The Dude and Wilbon! And in the other corner, fighting for coldly logical sports nuts who think really good players should make clutch foul shots, Head Dude and Kornheiser! All we need is Team Handsome (a.k.a. Undude and The Franchise) to round up some hit ring card girls for between rounds and we've got ourselves a pay-per-view spectacular...

4 comments:

The Dude said...

We don't need to go back that far in time to find an example. Memphis's Darius Washington missed 2 of 3 FTs in the C-USA tournament with an NCAA berth on the line. He was generally embraced by the school, its students and the Memphis media afterwards. Generally, I think people have a lot more compassion for college kids. Though I think the sympathy factor is obviously greater when it's a female athlete involved for the reasons that I've covered ad nauseum in the Journey post.

Head Dude said...

And I think we'd all agree that you can go back 5 years, and recall that Jason Williams was ripped all over the country for his one missed free threw, even though it was only made possible by an incredibly clutch three pointer he made while being fouled. In reality, this probably is an obvious point, but it always depends on circumstances. When the golden boy (williams) on the golden team (duke) screws up, everyone's happy to pile on. What will 80% of the country always say about Redick as a college player? He never stepped up in March. Which is true, of course, but made relevant only because he was the most well-known player in the country, as was Williams at the time.
So I guess what I'm saying is the dude's right about the sympathy factor being greater for females, and there's less criticism of men's players in college (more tends to fall on coaches), but there are always exceptions, and many seem to involve players wearing a Duke uniform!

Head Dude said...

A little bon mot to add to the dude's example: Darius Washington, once touted as one of the most promising point guards in the country, was on the Mavericks' summer-league and training-camp rosters this summer, but didn't make the team (beat out by Northeastern U's J.J. Barea) and from what I saw of him in training camp, doesn't look like a player likely to make the NBA any time soon. Just another casualty of foolishly turning pro early.
And of any player seemingly less deserving of sympathy, it was Washington on those free throws, since after making the first, he cockily signaled "it's over" for all to see. In fact it was over, but only for him.

Grizzly said...

I always liked that MJ commercial where they talked about all the game-winners he missed. It showed that if you take the chance to be "the man" that you will sometimes fail.

Harding made the play, right up until missing the free throws. She was the one that got the team in the situation to win. Sometimes you miss.